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zdrak 63 ( +1 | -1 )
Guess the Game ! Introducing a new quiz: Guess the Game !

Each week, I will post a game, which has a certain significance in the history of chess. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to answer the question:

WHAT IS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THIS GAME ?

Please note that I am not asking "who played this game" or "when was it played" (in the ChessBase era a trained monkey could answer those questions!). What I want to know - in one sentence, why is this game significant, what makes it special.

So, without further ado, game #1:

1.e4 e6
2.d4 d5
3.Nc3 Bb4
4.e5 c5
5.a3 Bxc3+
6.bxc3 Ne7
7.Qg4 Ng6
8.h4 h5
9.Qg3 Nc6
10.Bd3 Nce7
11.dxc5 Qa5
12.Bd2 Qxc5
13.Nf3 Bd7
14.0-0 Bb5
15.Be3 1-0
Black resigned

Good luck ....
More: Chess
triangulator 3 ( +1 | -1 )
i know! because it was really short
tonlesu 13 ( +1 | -1 )
quiz The game was Liberzon vs. Petrosian Moscow 1964. I'm not sure of its significance unless it was Petrosian's first loss as world champion.
gambitnut 5 ( +1 | -1 )
I know Shortest loss by a reigning world champion.
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tonlesu 2 ( +1 | -1 )
of course! Excellent gambitnut!
triangulator 2 ( +1 | -1 )
i was half right!!
zdrak 23 ( +1 | -1 )
Well done gambitnut!!

Indeed, this is the shortest loss ever by a reigning World Champ. By the way, shortest loss by an ex-world-champion is Christiansen-Karpov, 1993 (1-0, 12).

Stay tuned for the next question soon!
gambitnut 5 ( +1 | -1 )
Nope In 1979 Spassky lost in 10 moves to Lieb!
brunetti 4 ( +1 | -1 )
In 1979 Spassy wasn't reigning.

Alex
brunetti 4 ( +1 | -1 )
Ah, sorry, it was the answer to 12 moves of Karpov :)

Alex
zdrak 58 ( +1 | -1 )
Btw, while we're at it, I heard an amusing story about Steinitz: He was playing a skittles game against an amature, and the game began 1.e4 e5 2.Qh5. As Steinitz (black) leaned over the chessboard and contemplated his move, his beard accidentally touched the king. The amature player insisted that the touch-move rule should be observed, thus forcing Steinitz to resign at once (2...Ke7 3.Qxe5#), and making THIS GAME the shortest loss by a champion (just 1.5 moves!)

Of course nobody vouches for the credibility of this story (including myself), but a nice story nevertheless...
triangulator 29 ( +1 | -1 )
here is 1 try this 1 a lot of of here on GK should be familiar with it:)
1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Bb4
4. e3 O-O
5. Bd3 d5
6. Nf3 c5
7. O-O Nc6
8. a3 Bxc3
9. bxc3 dxc4
10. Bxc4 Qc7
11. Bd3 e5
12. Qc2 Re8
13. Nxe5 Nxe5
14. dxe5 Qxe5
15. f3 Be6
16. e4 c4
17. Be2 Qc5+
18. Kh1 Ra-d8
19. Rb1 b5
20. a4 a6
21. axb5 axb5
22. Qb2 Bd7
23. Rd1 Bc6
24. Ra1 Rxd1+
25. Bxd1 Bxe4
26. Bf4 Nh5
27. Bd6 Qxd6
28. fxe4 Nf6
29. Qxb5 Qd3
30. Bf3 Qxc3
31. Rf1 g6
32. h3 Kg7
33. Qb1 Qe5
34. Re1 h5
35. Rc1 Nxe4
36. Bxe4 Qxe4
37. Qa1+ Kg8
38. Qa4 Rc8
39. Rf1 Qd3
40. Rd1 Qf5
41. Rc1 c3
42. Qd4 c2
43. Qd2 h4
44. Kh2 Rc3
45. Qd8+ Kg7
46. Qd4+ Qf6
47. Qd2 Qe5+
48. Kh1 Qc5
49. Kh2 g5
50. Qe2 f6
51. Qd2 Kg6
52. Kh1 Qc6
53. Kh2 f5
54. Kg1 g4
55. hxg4 fxg4
56. Qf4 Qe6
57. Qd4 Re3
58. Qd2 Re2
59. Qd3+ Kg5
60. Kf1 Qe5
61. Qd8+ Kh5
62. Qd3 Re4
63. Qd2 g3
64. Rxc2 Qf6+
65. Kg1 Qd4+
66. Kf1 Rf4+
67. Ke1 Qg1+
68. Ke2 Qxg2+
69. Kd3 Qe4+
70. Kc3 Qb4+
71. Kd3 Qd4+
72. Ke2 Qe4+
73. Kd1
jameeboy 8 ( +1 | -1 )
I thought ... that zdrak was posting a weekly quiz... perhaps a new thread triangulator?
triangulator 6 ( +1 | -1 )
yah well he can do another here, I just thought of it, everyone should no it
zdrak 45 ( +1 | -1 )
Ok, Guess the Game continues! Here is game #2:
To make it hard, I will only give the final moves, starting from this position:

White: Ke3, Rc3, pawns e4, g5, h4
Black: Ke5, Rc8, pawns c4, g6, h5
The game concluded:

42. Rc2 c3
43. Kd3 Rd8+
44. Ke3 Rd4
45. Rxc3 Rxe4+
46. Kf3 Rxh4
47. Rc6 Rf4+
48. Ke3 Re4+
49. Kf3 Kf5
50. Rf6+ Kxg5
51. Rxg6+ Draw

Remember, please do not supply just the technical game info (who/when/where) unless you can also state (or at least try to guess!) the historic significance of the game.
tonlesu 55 ( +1 | -1 )
game Botvinnik vs Euwe Groningen 1946

I can think of several reasons for this game to stand out. The tournament was the first great tournament after the war. It was a qualifying tournament for the forthcoming world championship match.

In his book "15 games and their stories" Botvinnik says he considered the position above lost , knowing that Rubinstein had lost an analogous position to Lasker at St. Petersburg 1914. During the adjournment Botvinnik managed to find a hidden draw possibility. This half point was the difference between 1st (Botvinnik) and 2nd (Euwe).
zdrak 42 ( +1 | -1 )
Well, tonlesu pretty much nailed it.

I would like to add that according to chess historian M. Lindner, had Euwe won this game (and consecuently the tournament), there was a good chance he would be proclaimed by FIDE as World Champion.

Botvinnik himself concluded the notes to the game with the words: "A draw, without which the 1948 match-tournament would not have been held"
zdrak 18 ( +1 | -1 )
Guess the Game continues!

1. e4 c6
2. d4 d5
3. exd5 cxd5
4. c4 Nf6
5. Nc3 Nc6
6. Nf3 Bf5
7. c5 e6
8. Bb5 Nd7
9. Bf4 Be7
10. h3 O-O
11. O-O a6
12. Ba4 Rc8
13. Qe2 Re8
14. Rfe1 Nf8
15. Rad1 Ng6
16. Bh2 Nh4
17. Ne5 Bf8
18. Nxc6 bxc6
19. Qxa6 Qg5
20. Bg3 e5
21. Bxc6 Qh6
22. Bb7 Re6
23. Qf1 Bxh3
24. Bxh4 1-0

What is the historic significance of this game ?
tonlesu 13 ( +1 | -1 )
Panov- Midrov Moscow 1929

Perhaps, we see the Panov variation of the Caro Kann for the first time? (Just a guess)
zdrak 44 ( +1 | -1 )
Second in a row for tonlesu!

Yes, it's Panov - Mudrov (not Midrov, your database has a spelling error ;-), and indeed it's the first time the Panov Attack was played by its creator.

This is NOT the first game where the moves 3.cxd5 and 4.c4 were played, but in the previous games those have been sporadic and unplanned attempts to confuse the opponent by "playing out of book" - while this game actually became the first chapter of a new book!
tonlesu 11 ( +1 | -1 )
Mudrov Yes, quite active in 1929, playing in the Russian championship at Odessa, he lost to Botvinnik among others.