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ccmcacollister 144 ( +1 | -1 )
Sicilian (or KI) MAROCZY BIND Hey
I just had a couple Maroczy Binds today in blitz, and thought it would make a good subject for a forum thread~! Tho not as feared as it once was, it can still put the player who is not prepared, and willing to sac a "b" pawn, or pawn to "d5", appropriately ... it CAN become a real torture.

Everyone probably knows it can come from the Sicilian. Perhaps some won't know that very Maroczy postions can come from the King's Indian too, where BL is permitted to play cxd4. Sometimes those will even have Bg2 played, which can also be very hard to play against, and really locks up d5 ... tho it may invite counterplay from such as an ...f5 lever move sometimes.

Anyway, I would like to invite everyone to post their MAROCZY BIND, or similar type games here. Or those of other players of course. And any analysis or articles,
maybe even some games from Maroczy himself~! Hopefully. That would be very nice indeed. Or just any comments you have also, of course.

And was it Karpov or Kasparov that came up with the decent ....d5 sac line? I think it was actually Garry, in perhaps the very last game of one of their matches, where Black won ?

How bout some Maroczy's now!

Here is my blitz game just played tonight, that went to a standard Maroczy ...

ME vs ALCHYMIC666
____________________
1. e4 c5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. d4 cxd4
4. Nxd4 d6
5. Be3 e6
6. c4 Nf6
7. Nc3 a6
8. Bd3 Be7
9. Rc1 Qc7
10. O-O O-O
11. f3 Nxd4
12. Bxd4 e5
13. Be3 b6
14. Qe2 Bb7
15. Qf2 Bc6
16. Nd5 Nxd5
17. cxd5
________RESIGNED, 1-0
#####################
tim_b 29 ( +1 | -1 )
I have to admit I don't really know precislely what a Maroczy Bind is, but this one might qualify, which was more of a squeeze than a crush:

game

ionadowman 147 ( +1 | -1 )
Squeeze...? ... More like a squash, or a crush. ;-)
Two very good Maroczy Binds (MBs), coming from Sicilians, both showing how tough it is for Black to escape the toils. Craig - you've missed out one source of MBs - the English Opening. Here's one from a Wellington area Interclub teams competition 1977 (in re of one of your other threads, there were, when I lived there, at least 6 chess clubs in the greater Wellington region, maybe as many as nine. The Interclub went for 8 rounds so there must have been others I didn't know about!

Wellington InterClub, 14 July 1977.
White: I.A.Dowman Black: C. Bokany; English Opening.

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 c5 3.Nf3 g6 4.d4 cxd4
5.Nxc4 Bg7 6.e4 d6 7.f3 ... The dear old Maroczy Bind by transposition. You'd be surprised how often my opponents allowed this!
7...0-0 8.Be3 Nbd7 9.Be2 a6 10.Qd2 Qc7
11.Rc1 Nc5 12.b4 Ne6 13.Nd5 Qd1 14.Nxe6 Bxe6
15.0-0 Bxd5?! 16.cxd5 Nd7 17.a4 Rc8 18.a5 Ne5
19.f4 Nd7 20.Rxc8(! I really like this exchange, which leads to White's breaking into Black's position. At first sight, though, it looks completely motiveless!)
20...Qxc8
21.Rc1 Qb8 22.Qc2 Rd8 23.Qc7! Kf8! 24.g4!? Nf6
25.Bf3 Ne8 26.Qc4 Rd7 27.Bb6 e5?!
This loses a pawn at once, though Black does gain a bit of freedom...
28.dxe6 e.p. fxe6 29.Qxe6 Re7 30.Qc4 Rf7
31.f5 Be5 32.Bd1 gxf5 33.exf5 d5 34.Qxd5 Bxh2+
35.Kh1 Qg3 36.Bc5+ Nd6 37.Bb3 ...
b
At this point the game went to adjudication, but I was confident in the result: White wins by force, whatever Black plays. A sample conclusion runs -
37...Rf6 38.Qg8+ Ke7 39.Qg7+ Kd8 40.Bb6+ Ke8
41.Ba4+ Nb5 42.Rc8#. So: 1-0.
Cheers,
Ion
bonsai 101 ( +1 | -1 )
The relevant Karpov - Kasparov games are game 12 and 16 in the 24 game 1985 match (the second one after the aborted 1st one):

Karpov,A (2720) - Kasparov,G (2700) [B44]
World Championship 32th-KK2 Moscow (12), 03.10.1985

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Nf6 7.N1c3 a6 8.Na3 d5 9.exd5 exd5 10.cxd5 Nb4 11.Bc4 Bg4 12.Be2 Bxe2 13.Qxe2+ Qe7 14.Be3 Nbxd5 15.Nc2 Nxe3 16.Nxe3 Qe6 17.0-0 Bc5 18.Rfe1 0-0 1/2-1/2

Karpov,A (2720) - Kasparov,G (2700) [B44]
World Championship 32th-KK2 Moscow (16), 15.10.1985

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Nf6 7.N1c3 a6 8.Na3 d5 9.cxd5 exd5 10.exd5 Nb4 11.Be2 Bc5 12.0-0 0-0 13.Bf3 Bf5 14.Bg5 Re8 15.Qd2 b5 16.Rad1 Nd3 17.Nab1 h6 18.Bh4 b4 19.Na4 Bd6 20.Bg3 Rc8 21.b3 g5 22.Bxd6 Qxd6 23.g3 Nd7 24.Bg2 Qf6 25.a3 a5 26.axb4 axb4 27.Qa2 Bg6 28.d6 g4 29.Qd2 Kg7 30.f3 Qxd6 31.fxg4 Qd4+ 32.Kh1 Nf6 33.Rf4 Ne4 34.Qxd3 Nf2+ 35.Rxf2 Bxd3 36.Rfd2 Qe3 37.Rxd3 Rc1 38.Nb2 Qf2 39.Nd2 Rxd1+ 40.Nxd1 Re1+ 0-1

And the often quoted novely Karpov showed a bit later is the following:
Karpov,A (2700) - Van der Wiel,J (2555) [B44]
Brussels SWIFT Brussels, 1986

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Nf6 7.N1c3 a6 8.Na3 d5 9.cxd5 exd5 10.exd5 Nb4 11.Be2 Bc5 12.Be3 Bxe3 13.Qa4+ Nd7 14.Qxb4 Bc5 15.Qe4+ Kf8 16.0-0 b5 17.Nc2 Nf6 18.Qd3 g6 19.Bf3 Bf5 20.Qd2 h5 21.Nd4 Bg4 22.Nc6 Qd6 23.Ne4 Nxe4 24.Bxe4 Kg8 25.Rac1 Re8 26.Qd3 Bb6 27.Bf3 Bc7 28.g3 Qf6 29.Rc3 Bb6 30.Rb3 Bh3 31.Bg2 Bg4 32.Bf3 Bh3 33.Bg2 Bg4 34.Qc3 Qd6 35.Re1 Rxe1+ 36.Qxe1 Qf6 37.h3 Bd7 38.Rf3 Qd6 39.Qc3 Bf5 40.h4 Kh7 41.Bh3 b4 42.Qe1 Qxd5 43.Bg2 Qe6 44.Qxb4 Qxc6 45.Rxf5 Qc1+ 46.Kh2 gxf5 47.Qxb6 Qh6 48.Qd4 Re8 49.Bh3 f4 50.gxf4 Kg8 51.b4 Qg7 52.Qd7 Re1 53.Qd8+ Kh7 54.Bf5+ Kh6 55.Qg5+ Qxg5 56.fxg5+ Kg7 57.Bd3 Ra1 58.Bc4 Rb1 59.a3 Ra1 60.Bxa6 Rxa3 61.Be2 Ra2 1/2-1/2
ionadowman 70 ( +1 | -1 )
Interesting line... ... especially the second K-K game - a real battle!

But I wonder if they really "qualify" as Maroczy Bind games, despite the c4- e4- pawn setup. In the line played (I've forgotten what it's called) White never really establishes a bind as such - or if he does, Black breaks out of it very easily, on account of the advanced White knight.

The Maroczy Bind is usually associated with attempts by Black to play an Accelerated Dragon Defence without incurring the dreaded Porcupine Attack (Yugoslav Attack). But maybe I'm being too picky? Of course, when the thing arises out of an English Opening or King's Indian defence, Black has no such motive in mind.

Cheers,
Ion
lighttotheright 34 ( +1 | -1 )
Cyrano is currently playing a game against Rodog that his white pieces (Cyrano) passed through a Maroczy Bind like pawn formation. The game is not a true Maroczy Bind but is Sicilian--looks like the Moscow Variation. Since the game is on going, I won't comment on it any further; but it should be very interesting.